‘Bachelor’ Juan Pablo spoilers: Why does Andi Dorfman leave the Fantasy Suite?

“Bachelor” Juan Pablo gets dumped during the overnight dates on Tuesday night. Host Chris Harrison has been hyping the Fantasy Suite episode that airs Feb. 25 as yet another “explosive” and “dramatic” episode that will leave fans on the edge of their seats. Or not.

ABC’s previews for Tuesday night’s episode shows Andi Dorfman walking out of the Fantasy Suite muttering that she wants to leave St. Lucia as soon as possible. Either Juan Pablo didn’t live up to her expectations in the sack or he said something that ticked her off.

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Blogger Reality Steve Carbone writes that the situation is “nothing major” and it’s likely Juan Pablo put his “foot in his mouth again” during his overnight date. Carbone goes on to write that he thinks it has something to do with Juan Pablo chatting it up about the other girls during what’s supposed to be a romantic date in a secluded room. That sounds about right, but it’s more likely that Andi was excited to leave St. Lucia without Juan Pablo due to an offer from ABC.

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Rumor has it that Andi Dorfman is the next “Bachelorette”, so there is a distinct possibility that the show’s producers told Dorfman that she would get a nice, fat paycheck if she ditched Juan Pablo. Of course, they allowed her to enjoyed a romp with him in the Fantasy Suite first.

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Signing a contract with ABC may ruin the 26-year-old Assistant District Attorney’s career, but perhaps one of her 20 suitors will actually know how to hold a conversation, something that’s been sorely lacking in this season of “The Bachelor.”

The Mystic Union of the Artist and Local Tradition Displayed

The Folk Art Centre, located in Battaramulla, is the place to visit for those who love Sri Lankan handicrafts. Coconut-shell sculptures, silver jewelry, batik garments, hand-painted items, pottery and brassware are available to be purchased at quite reasonable prices. The craftsmen too are friendly and willing to talk of the crafts they love and the serenity of the shaded pathways is ideal for relaxing.

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Tucked away between the shrieking colorful cities peacefully lies a safe haven of charm. As the noise of the busy everyday life fades in to the blurry distance, and the only sound you hear is the mystic whispering of the sheltering trees, the magic of olden days take shape, in green, green grass and pretty old huts, severely innocent of the dazzle and color of the abode of the present day, and you find yourself pleasantly lost in the Folk Art Complex, popularly known as the Janakala Kendraya. Here, sunny smiles will greet you every step of the way, resurrected age-old Sri Lankan handicrafts will gleam in the stalls, and emerald shade will beckon you to sit a while or rest awhile or maybe have a fine read.

The Folk Art Complex features souvenirs galore! Everything from sculptures of coconut shells, jewelry made of shining silver, colorful garments of batik make, pretty little pieces of pottery and beautiful brassware with bullion sheen will be available to take home at quite reasonable prices.

This sublime location is an ideal place to visit with children too, as the friendly craftsmen are ever willing to chat with the inquisitive souls seeking glimpses into their craft. One may also choose to silently observe the deft fingers of the silversmiths as they bring life to their creativity as intricate pieces of silver.

A visitor to the Folk Art Centre will see the many colorful facets of Sri Lankan handicrafts displayed for the common man to see. Hiding in the city of Battaramulla, this unique place is a must-visit to those who like to have a concentrated Sri Lankan experience, while grabbing a souvenir with a whiff of the wholesome life style of this country.

Reaching the Folk Art Centre is quite easy, as it is located in close proximity to Colombo, the commercial Capital of Sri Lanka travel guides will most willingly accompany tourists to the location as well. Since Sri Lanka tours often cover the city of Colombo, one cannot miss an opportunity for an arranged trip to this unique place. Upon request, the local tour companies too will arrange visits to Folk Art Centre. Out of the many established tour companies in Sri Lanka, Jetwing Travels is in the lead, with their strong credentials in the hospitality industry in Sri Lanka, and provide many options to their customers with tours covering all the fascinating facets of the Pearl of the Indian Ocean.

Government infiltrating websites to ‘deny, disrupt, degrade, deceive’

According to some of the newest Edward Snowden leaks as reported on by Glenn Greenwald on Monday, government spies are infiltrating websites in an effort to persuade public opinion and discredit opposition.

The documents from the GCHQ (the British equivalent of the NSA), titled “The Art of Deception: Training for Online Covert Operations,” were given to the NSA and leaked by Snowden. They reveal that the GCHQ is involved, through a unit known as JTRIG (Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group), in “the monitoring of YouTube and Blogger, the targeting of Anonymous with the very same DDoS attacks they accuse ‘hacktivists’ of using, the use of ‘honey traps’ (luring people into compromising situations using sex) and destructive viruses.”

Further, according to Greenwald, “these agencies are attempting to control, infiltrate, manipulate, and warp online discourse, and in doing so, are compromising the integrity of the internet itself.”

The goals of the JTRIG program are “(1) to inject all sorts of false material onto the internet in order to destroy the reputation of its targets; and (2) to use social sciences and other techniques to manipulate online discourse and activism to generate outcomes it considers desirable.”

They do this through the use of several tactics, as listed by a slide from the documents: “Infiltration Operation,” “Ruse operation,” “Set Piece Operation,” “False Flag Operation,” “False Rescue Operation,” Disruption Operation” and “Sting Operation.”

Another slide lists ways to “discredit a target”: “Set up a honey-trap,” “Change their photos on social networking sites,” “Write a blog purporting to be one of their victims,” “Email/text their colleagues, neighbours, friends, etc.”

There’s also a slide on how to discredit a business: “Leak confidential information to companies/the press via blogs etc,” “Post negative information on appropriate forums,” “Stop deals/ruin business relationships.”

A further slide lists the definition of the effects of the agency’s activities: “Using online techniques to make something happen in the real or cyber world.” This includes two categories: “Information Ops (influence or disruption)” and “Technical disruption,” along with the four D’s: “Deny/Disrupt/Degrade/Deceive.”

Greenwald also points out that these tactics are not just used for counter-terrorism, but “against people suspected (but not charged or convicted) of ordinary crimes or, more broadly still, ‘hacktivism’, meaning those who use online protest activity for political ends.”

“The title page of one of these documents reflects the agency’s own awareness that it is ‘pushing the boundaries’ by using ‘cyber offensive’ techniques against people who have nothing to do with terrorism or national security threats, and indeed, centrally involves law enforcement agents who investigate ordinary crimes,” writes Greenwald.

While the idea that government has paid people, known as shills, to post in message boards and other websites in an effort to disrupt conversations has long been believed by conspiracy theorists, this would seem to confirm that it’s happening.

There have been similar reports in the past of the government attempting to influence public opinion through the Internet.

As Greenwald mentions in his article, Cass Sunstein, Obama’s former science czar, wrote in a paper that the government should employ people to “cognitively infiltrate” groups including “chat rooms, online social networks, or even real-space groups.” His main target was conspiracy theorists. He further proposed making it illegal to be a conspiracy theorist.